Vertical Damper Installation, Part 1: AirScape Models

Over the years ve’ve also fielded a lot of questions from customers wanting to know if our fans’ dampers can be installed vertically (i.e. in a wall rather than over a ceiling) or at an angle on top of a vaulted ceiling. The short answer to both questions is “yes”, but there are some important limits that need to be considered, which we’d like to go over. Please note: this blog post is limited to our line of AirScape fans—Kohilo models will be covered in a future post.

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Check Out this Great Video

As you may have heard, we are currently running a promotion offering rebates to customers who send us a video of themselves installing or operating their fan. You can read more about that promotion here, but you should also check out this video that was recently submitted by one of our customers—we’re really excited to share it because it was so well done.

And the video wasn’t the only thing well done. We often field questions as to how our fans’ dampers can be installed in a vertical orientation, or how to organize the installation in an attic with low clearance. This customer did a great job of both. Also, you’ll notice that this customer used many of our fans’ available accessories: the Openable, Washable Grille; an Acoustic Plenum; Wireless Remote; SafeSpeed Kit; and our Data Monitoring Package.

While we can’t identify them here, we’d like to thank our customer for sending us that great video. We’re looking forward to sharing more as the promotion continues.

Send Us Your Videos, Get a Rebate!

movie-camera-and-film-clipart-rg_1_24_camera_icon_estilizado_scalable_vector_graphics_svg-2555pxWhen we’re designing our whole house fans, we here at AirScape endeavor to make them as easy as possible to install. Over the years, this effort has led us to create damper boxes that fit easily on 16″ or 24″ on-center framing, “plug & play” controls that use  low-voltage CAT-5 wiring, and a new latching mechanism for attaching ductwork to our new 5.0e. Our goal is simple: we want do-it-yourselfers to feel confident in installing AirScape fans themselves.

We often hear back from customers once they’ve finished installing their fans. Customers with unique installations often want to share their experience, and many customers simply want to share their pride in their own installation and excitement about our fans. We loving hearing back and getting feedback (both good and bad) from our customers. We’d love our customers to share more—we’d even like to offer a rebate to those who do.

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How to Install and Program an AirScape LCF Remote Control

***** NOTE: THIS POST ONLY APPLIES TO THE LCF VERSION OF THE REMOTE CONTROL ******

1. Plug the remote antenna into the control board 4-pin connection

2. Program the remote transmitter by cycling the power to the WHF off and on (unplugging and plugging in the power cord) or by pressing remote reset button

– A red LED on the control board will begin to flash indicating that the control board is ready to mate with your remote transmitter

– Press any button on the hand held transmitter

– The red LED will blink off

– Your WHF is now ready to use

3. Repeat this process to program additional remote transmitters

TOP 5 – Common Installation Errors

(1) Forgetting your attic gets hot in the summer – Buy and install your unit in the fall, winter, or spring when your attic isn’t 150 degrees

(2) Wiring wall switch to auxiliary actuator terminal – Doing so will blow the AirScape circuit breaker and possibly damage the control board. Check out our blog “Correctly Wire Your Wall Switch

(3) Switching the 110v power – So the AirScape plugs into an outlet …why not have that on a switch? First of all, doing so will not turn your unit on and off. All you will be doing is providing power to the actuator(s) and control board. By switching this power off you are eliminating the effect of having an automatic motorized damper door. This will cause you to lose the airtight seal that the closed door(s) create (one reason an AirScape is an AirScape) and allow conditioned air to escape to the attic.

(4) Installing the wall switch up side down – If the writing stamped on the metal is upside down, so is your switch.

(5) Installing the unit so the junction box is difficult to access – The more difficult it is to access your control board, the more challenging it will be to wire your wall switch.

Unique and Challenging Installs – #1

The first challenging install in our series comes from Anker in California. We love this challenging install because of the way he overcame the low attic clearance and the collar beams you can see in the photos (Click photos to enlarge).

Anker’s challenge was to find a suitable damper box location that was free of electrical junction boxes but also did not have a collar beam above it. The next challenge was to find a location for the fan where the ductwork could be installed properly (90 degree bend and fully extended). In this attic the path of the duct and fan would have run into a collar beam. To overcome this Anker made a scale drawing of the attic and also laid out the ductwork on the ground to mock up the installation. His next step was to mount the damper box and then hang the fan. By hanging the fan before attaching the ductwork he was able to determine where it would fit best. The final step was to attach the ductwork to the damper box, feed it over a collar beam and attach it to the fan.

The advice Anker would give anyone doing this installation would be to:

Use a helper when hanging the fan (due to the weight)

Have an electrician wire the outlet

Pre-drill holes for attaching the duct to the fan collar



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