HEPA Filtration for Hospitals

How times change…

A few weeks ago we were ramping up our whole house fan production for the summer season. Now we are very busy making HEPA filtration units for hospitals, and yes, observing Covid safety protocols. Masks [check], distancing [check], good ventilation [check], doors open for extra air dilution [check], hand sanitizer [check], outdoor breaks in the sun [check]. We spent a lot of time writing procedures on how to stay safe.

Contact us if we can help you out with your business.

HEPA filtration units being built for hospitals

Whole House Fans vs. Attic Ventilators

What is the difference between a Whole House Fan and an Attic Ventilator? First of all the Whole House Fan is mounted in the attic, while an Attic Ventilator is mounted on the roof or the gable wall of an attic.

The Whole House Fan pulls in cool outside air when you open the windows at night and exhausts the stale, hot air out. It is a natural source of fresh air that saves energy. Because a WHF operates between 2000 CFM and 6000 CFM they quickly exhaust hot indoor air and bring in the cool outside air.

An Attic Ventilator’s purpose is to get hot air out of your attic and bring cool air in. However, it can be pulling that cool air from your house. The fan can depressurize the attic by exhausting air from it, as well. Replacement air comes in either from the outside intake vents or from openings/cracks into the house. The main reason to cool an attic is if you store things in it or have ductwork or HVAC equipment up there. If this is the case, your HVAC equipment and ductwork would better serve you in the interior of your home somewhere, or the insulation should be moved from the attic floor to the sloped roofing of your house.

As you can see the Whole House Fan is designed to cool your home and save you energy while the Attic Ventilator, while good in theory, can actually pull cool air from your home and in turn cost you more in energy.

New Product Development Update

Direct Vent System for Greenhouse and Warehouse Ventilation

Engineers here at AirScape are currently working on the finishing touches of a direct vent exhaust fan designed for industrial and commercial applications such as large indoor greenhouses and warehouses.

The system can be configured for roof or wall exhaust and has automatic Powered AirLock doors. There is an inlet louver with a Powered AirLock so that the space can be sealed up when no exhaust is desired.

Preliminary airflow testing is still incomplete because it outperforms our test chamber’s capacity…  Well over 8500 cfm on only speed 6 (out of 10)! More data to follow as we recalibrate be able to accurately test such high airflow.

For more info, email us at experts@airscapefans.com

Q-CFM What kind of CFM is that ?

If you’re reading the blog post, you probably noticed that we have a new measurement of airflow shown on our website. CFM is a common abbreviation for Cubic Feet per Minute. This is a measure of how many cubic feet of air a fan moves per minute.

The new measurement is based on our creation. The Q-CFM™.

You’ve probably also noticed that the Q-CFM™ number is about 30% higher than the official (and correct) airflow rating that we obtain through rigorous testing.

We have devised this (tongue in cheek) rating system to counter and illustrate some misleading information. One of our competitors is routinely advertising and using airflow numbers that are well over 30% higher than the official airflow rating that they submit to the California Energy Commission.

So, the Q-CFM™  is an abbreviation for Quackery Cubic Feet per Minute.

If you have any questions about how we measure and report airflow, please feel free to email or call us on the phone. We’re happy to chat.

 

 

Truth in AirFlow

It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they have been fooled.

-Mark Twain

 

We here at AirScape have spent a lot of time and effort testing and ensuring that our products provide the airflow and the energy use that we state. Take a look at this interesting video of our test chamber.

We just heard that one of our competitors (QC Manufacturing aka Quiet Cool Fans) has entered into a settlement agreement with the California Energy Commission. The most important part of that agreement is this:

“From December 15, 2015, to July 18, 2016, QC sold or offered for sale either directly or through retailers, distributors, or installers whole house fans in California that were listed in the Database with greater air flow and air flow efficiency data than could be verified by the Commission’s testing laboratory, in violation of sections 1606(a)(3)(E)(l) and 1608”

There are no Federal standards other than truth in advertising laws to specifically keep people in our industry honest. So we are grateful to the California Energy Commission for ensuring that customer receive what they paid for.

Thanks to our great customers and we look forward to keeping your homes cool this summer !

Here are some useful links.

CEC Docket Log

Actual Settlement Agreement